Tag Archives: magazine

The Art of the Story Writing Workshop with Tom Jenks in San Francisco…..

I have not attended this workshop yet – but I will soon because I just got accepted yesterday. Yea! It promises to be amazing! Check it out…

One of my very sweet, and possibly delusional friends, mentioned that if I ever get famous enough for Mr. Jenks to admit  claim he’s worked with me, my name would appear below Kurt Vonnegut. That would not be awful! 😉

The Art of the Story with TOM JENKS

The class will meet every day for four days, with a morning workshop and an afternoon seminar focused on craft. For the seminar, there will be reading assignments and study of works by well-known writers. Each participant will have one manuscript workshopped in class and a second manuscript reviewed for an individual conference with Tom. We will study storytelling and the formal elements of fiction, including voice, point of view, characterization, imagery, plot, and theme. Attention will also be given to scene building, sentence making, and the dramatic movement of descriptive writing.

Enrollment is limited to twelve participants. (Acceptance into the class will be based on evaluation of a submitted manuscript.)

Class Dates:
San Francisco           January 15—18, 2015
San Francisco           January 29—February 1, 2015
San Francisco           February 26—March 1, 2015

Application deadline:

November 15, 2014

To apply or to receive more information:

  • Please send an email to Workshops.
  • The classes often fill quickly, well before the application deadlines, so if you’re interested in a class, we encourage you to contact us promptly.

WRITERS EDITED AND PUBLISHED BY TOM JENKS INCLUDE:

Rick Bass
Richard Bausch
Ann Beattie
T. Coraghessen Boyle
Janet Burroway
Robert Olen Butler
Michael Chabon
Frank Conroy
Don DeLillo
E. L. Doctorow
Andre Dubus
Stuart Dybek
Jennifer Egan
Gail Godwin
Donald Hall
Ron Hansen
Charles Johnson
Min Jin Lee
Bernard Malamud
Anthony Marra
Peter Matthiessen
Jill McCorkle
Arthur Miller
Susan Minot
Lorrie Moore
Alice Munro
Maud Newton
Joyce Carol Oates
Jayne Anne Phillips
Annie Proulx
Kirstin Valdez Quade
Philip Roth
James Salter
Scott Spencer
Robert Stone
John Updike
Kurt Vonnegut
John Edgar Wideman
Tom Wolfe
Tobias Wolff
Richard Yates
Alexi Zentner

If you enjoyed this post, you can read about other workshops here.

PressReader – a review

@EllenWeeren

As you might know, this blog is not a “review” blog, so you won’t see a lot of products being touted here. However, PressReader recently contacted me and asked me to review their newspaper app – in fact, it is the largest newspaper and magazine kiosk app for iOS, Android, BlackBerry and Windows. (Just so you know, they gave me access to a free trial version but I did not receive any compensation for sharing my thoughts on the app nor will I receive anything if you sign up for their services.)

But I must say, this is a fabulous app! I really love it. Through it you have instant access to over 2,300 online newspapers and magazines.

pressreader

With it you can

  • sort publications by language or country
  • establish your own list of favorites
  • listen to articles using on-demand audio
  • zoom in/out on articles
  • determine how long it will take to read an article (good for considering ad purchases)
  • share articles on facebook or twitter

If you want to see their demo – click here.

As I said, I don’t usually (or ever) do reviews but this intrigued me – largely because I have seen the world news announced from somewhere other than the United States. When we lived in India, we saw the world news as just that – the world news. Not as the world news according to what has happened in America.

Now, I love me some United States. I do. I am her biggest fan. Quite possibly ever.

But, ahem.

We Americans tend to be pretty centric when it comes to what we really care about. Please know that I know that we rush to the aid of other countries when they experience disaster – we are some generous folks with our sweat and our dollars. But for the most part, we really aren’t that aware of what is happening around the world. Or at least, the rest of the world.

Today we are consumed with the rescue of the three young ladies in Cleveland. We are grateful they were found. We worry that they will never recover from their experience. We wonder how this could have possibly happened and continued for so long And, we tune out the reality that girls are stolen all over the world. Every day.

Please know that this is in no way meant to diminish the horror of the experience for these young women. But, in the U.S., it is thankfully uncommon to lose your daughter – in other parts of the world, it is far less uncommon.

On the day of the Boston bombings, we gathered around t.v. sets for hours praying that the terrorists would be found. Twenty-four constant hours a day, the news reporters gave us the “breaking news” updates. If an ambulance moved, we knew about it. And believe me, I was near a t.v. almost all day long waiting, hoping for good news.

However, within a few days of the Boston attacks a factory collapsed in Bangladesh with barely a mention on our nightly news. Ultimately, the death toll rose to 800 when the factory caught fire after its collapse. Those workers were busy making clothes, many of which would be sold in American stores, when they died. And most Americans are very likely unaware that it ever happened.

So beyond the obvious benefits of this app – tremendous ease of access all in one place, the ability to watch business trends in other parts of the world, and the ability to easily research an area through local eyes before planning to travel there – there is the chance to become more globally aware of what is happening in the world and to hear different perspectives on those events.

If you want to learn more, please visit their site – www.PressReader.com